Two-week FREE trial! Full access, zero catches, cancel any time – Register Now

Workout Category: 44 Modern Rudiments

44.44 – Book Report

What do you get when you take a paradiddle and add an accented diddle on the front and an unaccented Swiss drag on the back? Why a book report of course. (Of course? -yeah, I have no idea who named this one.)

44.43 – Cheese Chut-A-Cha

This rudiment is just like the chut-a-cha, but now we’re whipping into an accented diddle. The demands come at you fast: low fast finger dribble into a whip stroke into a double accented diddle…

44.42 – Chut-A-Cha

“Chut-a-cha” is an onomatopoeia, much like many other rudiment names. There’s a flam on the first and third of three partials, though only the first one is accented.

44.41 – Flam 5’s

How many notes can you cram into three partials? About this many. If you combine flam accent cheese and flam drags, you’ve got the flam five.

44.40 – Flam Drag

These are many people’s favorite rudiment, and for good reason; they’re fun to play and sound cool. A lot of people consider flam drags a “right of passage” of sorts into advanced rudimental vocabulary.

44.39 – Tap Drag

You could easily argue that this is a slurred inversion of the traditional “drag tap” rudiment, but you basically never see “drag tap’s” and I like to call a spade a spade.

44.38 – Drag

Whoops, you’ve ended up in a Members Only Area!   If you’re not already a member, please feel free to check out our FREE sample workout or go ahead and register for a new account. Username Password Remember Me     Forgot Password

44.37 – Pat-A-Fla-Fla

This rudiment has been around for a long time, yet most people still struggle with it. It’s all about the two hands coordination totally opposite hand motions, the “Moeller whip & stop” and the “No-chop flop & drop.”

44.36 – Swiss Drag

These are really fun as there’s a lot of bang for buck (lots of beats with minimal effort). The “Flop-ga-dick” is the key hand motion–flop out of the accent into the little diddle squeezed out by the fingers

44.35 – Swiss Army Triplet

I discovered these all by myself when I was in middle school; they’re like flam accents except way easier since each hand only plays two notes!